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The New 300 mm f/4 PF ED Nikkor E


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  • https://www.fotozones.com/live/uploads/monthly_03_2015/ccs-15-0-27946000-1425641661.jpg,monthly_03_2015/ccs-15-0-04758700-1425641369.jpg,monthly_03_2015/ccs-15-0-45867100-1425642234.jpg,monthly_03_2015/ccs-15-0-95074700-1425642412.jpg,monthly_03_2015/ccs-15-0-67007400-1425642589.jpg,monthly_03_2015/ccs-15-0-94160800-1425645946.jpg,monthly_03_2015/ccs-15-0-86281700-1425646047.jpg,monthly_03_2015/ccs-15-0-46809900-1425646190.jpg,monthly_03_2015/ccs-15-0-47152700-1425646384.jpg,monthly_03_2015/ccs-15-0-95101300-1425766084.jpg

In terms of size, the use of a Fresnel principle has indeed dwarfed this 300 compared to other lenses of the same speed and focal length. Without its beefy sunshade, the PF Nikkor is just a tad longer to say an ED 180 mm f/2.8. It's lighter as well. Filter is the by now ubiquitous 77 mm size. Build and workmanship follow the current slick yet curiously anonymous fashion of modern Nikkors. The lens is slim enough to share the removable tripod collar of the 70-200 mm f/4 Nikkor. In common with that lens, the tripod collar is an optional extra. My review sample had no collar so I haven't been able to assess its qualities, perhaps owners of the 70-200/4 can pitch in here.

The flight control deck on the left-hand side has settings for A/M, M/A, and M focusing modes. Apart from the pretty obvious implication of 'M' mode, one really has to consult the paperwork to decide upon the difference between A/M and M/A modes. Apparently M/A allows faster override on the AF functionality, but the information provided by Nikon here is terse and slightly confusing. Perhaps I need to become a hard-core AF enthusiast to appreciate the true difference. There is also a range switch to limit the lens to focus within infinity to 3 m. The near limit is approx. 1.4m, which does allow for some pretty tightly framed close-ups. AF speed is decent, but no more, on my Df. Accuracy was excellent so no need for any fine tuning here.

Nikon follows the practice of some recent lenses by giving the 300 PF an electronic aperture. This means some of the older Nikons, say from the D2 series or earlier, cannot control the lens aperture. It's quite clear Nikon wants to introduce 'E' aperture to every new Nikkor, but thankfully they have commenced this make-over with specialised high-end products first. Despite the operational advantages of 'E' envisioned by Nikon, I still much prefer the fail-safe and time-tested manual aperture control directly on the lens. My Df simply calls for lenses with aperture rings to yield the perfect handling of the camera/lens combination. However, the 300 PF isn't that badly functional on the Df if you close your eyes to the lack of an aperture ring.

VR is implemented via a three-way slider control to give 'Off, 'Normal' and 'Sport' settings. There is the usual confusion as to what really controls VR; the shutter release or the AF-ON button. Or perhaps both, at least in 'Sports' mode.

The Fresnel lens construction shortens the optical path significantly. At the same time, new kinds of optical issues are introduced. It's obvious Nikon has mulled over this design for quite a long time until they finally decided to give it a go. Thus, expectations of high performance are natural and the rather stiff pricing point adds to this as well.

Now, to the business end of this Nikkor.

The main properties are as follows;

  • The image is very sharply rendered corner to corner.
  • Vignetting (corner light fall-off) is present at the widest apertures.
  • Bokeh and blurring of background is nice. However, mechanical vignetting ("cat's eyes" blur circles) can be seen towards the image periphery at the widest aperture settings. Blur circles are kept quite circular up to f/6.3 and some edginess can be seen at f/7.1.
  • As expected from a telephoto design, there is some geometric distortion of the pincushion type. However, the levels are low, thus even architecture could be depicted with only occasional need of any post-processing correction.
  • There is a surprisingly high amount of chromatic aberration given its ED design. Most if not all of this is of the lateral kind, though, so removal in a decent RAW conversion programme is quite easy. It is worth noting that the preview shown in camera is based upon a jpg and accordingly, the lateral chromatic aberration is almost impossible to detect there. Open up a NEF however and you'll see LCA in spades.
  • Image contrast is slightly lower than what we see with ordinary telephoto designs. Thus most captures benefit from a slight tweaking of contrast later in the work flow.
  • Bleeding of highlights apparently is kept under excellent control.

Time perhaps to put up some real sample images?

This is a snapshot across the valley where I live, in the northern parts of Oslo. The depth of the scene is about 1 km. shot at f/5, 1/1000 sec, 250 ISO, with my Df and the 300 PF hand-held. No VR.

The entire frame is presented, no adjustments other than a small detail increase in PhotoNinja to counteract the slightly low contrast of the PF lens. LCA reduction is applied as well.

Please view large.

gallery_2_446_16020.jpg

Here is an example of the detectable, yet very low pincushion distortion exhibited by the 300 PF.

gallery_2_446_127168.jpg

Entire frame scaled to 2000x1333 pix, 1/1000 sec at f/7.1, 160 ISO, hand-held, on Df.

The rendition of the out-of-focus areas is quite pleasing and you can stop down a bit a still keep the background sufficiently smooth.

This is f/7.1 at which point the blur circles from specular highlights start to lose their perfectly circular shape. With the PF (Phase Fresnel) optics goes a propensity for forming 'onion rings' with these blur circles. They indeed do occur, but not as distinct as say exhibited by the new AFS 20 mm f/1.8 Nikkor.

gallery_2_446_54011.jpg

OK, so we know the new lens works. Let's look more at some details of its behaviour.

The Fresnel principle may introduce issues by flare and lowered micro contrast. It's evident Nikon has addressed these areas: although an overall lowered contrast is a hallmark of the 300 PF, it handles scene contrast surprisingly well.

Here, I tried to provoke severe flare by shooting sun reflecting off a window frame. According to the light meter, and the in-camera preview, the capture should be well and thoroughly overexposed. However, thanks to the dynamic latitude of the Df's sensor, and some internal wizardry of PhotoNinja, only a very small part of the image is actually blown out. This is the entire frame,

ccs-15-0-04758700-1425641369_thumb.jpg

The 100% crop of the overexposed area clearly shows how well the PF lens handled the immense contrast. The transition from blown to parts with some details intact is very smooth and gradual and flare entering the darker brick wall is controlled. Most telephoto lenses of conventional construction could be hard pressed to render these details any better.

ccs-15-0-27946000-1425641661_thumb.jpg

I've alluded to chromatic nasties a few times already, so time to scrutinise this potential problematic area.

On subjects with inherent high contrast, such as snow on branches or trees seen against the sky, the 300 PF shows significant amounts of lateral chromatic aberration. As usual for this kind of colour issue, the fringing increases in intensity towards the peripheral parts of the frame. Here is an example, taken under low contrast light during a morning snow fall (the crop is the lower left corner and the branches are not in the plane of best focus).

ccs-15-0-45867100-1425642234_thumb.jpg

However, due to the lateral nature of these fringes, a quick fix in PhotoNinja clears up the rendition remarkably well. The crop below is the same frame run through PhotoNinja's automatic Chromatic aberration Tool so basically is a one-click affair.

ccs-15-0-95074700-1425642412_thumb.jpg

The readiness by which LCA is cleared in the software conversion is an indirect sign of low longitudinal chromatic aberration ('axial colour'). This detail of a snow-covered chair, taken at 45 degrees of incidence at the near limit, shows axial colour indeed is almost perfectly gone;

ccs-15-0-67007400-1425642589_thumb.jpg

Thus, one can expect crisp and clear colour rendition for close-ups. A most welcome departure from the stock Micro lenses (Nikon and other brands the names of which shall not be mentioned) with all their murky colour fringing around the focused plane.

Now, to the VR performance. It's no secret I'm not in general too keen on having VR incorporated in a lens as the optics become more complex, and you do lose some control over detail rendition and the manner in which the image blurs appear. Nothing beats a well-designed (not necessarily heavy) tripod for getting the sharpest shots. However, it cannot be denied the stabilising feature can save your day -or make you get the picture - once in a while, so I'll accept it grudgingly as long as it can be switched off easily.

The 300 PF Nikkor has three setings for VR: Off (should be in the default position but isn't), Normal (which occupies the middle default location), and Sport. The paperwork accompanying the lens isn't very clear what the decisive differences between Normal and Sport really are. I assume the Sport mode allows a little more movement of the camera say for panning, but haven't seen much of a difference during my tests. Both VR modes apparently get into action when the shutter release is pushed halfway down, whether or not AF is initiated by the release, and deactivate if you use AF-ON to focus. A configuration that really does not make much sense to me and it defeats the purpose of the dedicated AF-ON control found on the better Nikon models.

Notwithstanding these niggles, VR really works quite well on the 300/4 PF Nikkor and you can, with some luck, shoot at 3 stops slower than the normal recommended shutter speed.

I shot some VR test shots using an Olympus DSLR as subject, to hearten Dallas' mind perhaps. Thee setting were ISO 250, f/4.5, and 1/40 sec with the lens hand-held on the Df. The entire frame is here,

ccs-15-0-94160800-1425645946_thumb.jpg

and the 100% crop of the frame with VR off clearly shows I cannot get a sharp image at that speed with a hand-held 300 mm lens. No big surprise. Let this be the reference to assess the efficacy of VR.

ccs-15-0-86281700-1425646047_thumb.jpg

Here is the same subject , now with VR in Normal mode;

ccs-15-0-46809900-1425646190_thumb.jpg

The improvement in image clarity is quite significant to my eyes.

Using Sports mode for VR produces more or less the same result as Normal, but there is a tendency to a slightly harsher background rendition. Could be a fluke under the current abysmal shooting conditions, so take this observation with at least a pinch of salt. I'll try to repeat later.

ccs-15-0-47152700-1425646384_thumb.jpg

If weather improves I might venture into the field to shoot more interesting scenery. All in due time.

Aargh, still inclement weather. Thus the Moth Orchids in the window of my girl friend's home had to serve as test subjects for the close-up performance of the 300 PF. Nikon's data sheet specifies a reproduction ratio of 0.24x (approx. 1:4), which were the 300 a zoom lens would have netted it a 'Macro' designation.

However, one-fourth life-size is in no way true 'macro', so the 300 PF was saved from such disgrace. In common with most telephoto lenses, its performance drops at near range, as plainly seen in this capture of Phalaenopsis flowers. Shot at f/4, 1/250 sec ISO 400, with VR Normal activated. I tried this, and other flowers, using VR Sport mode, and had severe trouble getting focus accuracy because VR kicked in as soon as I touched the shutter release and jilted the focus off target. Besides, many of the shots (at 1/125 sec) had double contours to indicate VR-induced movement.

ccs-15-0-95101300-1425766084_thumb.jpg

Thus, the 300 mm f/4 PF Nikkor is no substitute for a Micro-Nikkor or equivalent lens. But it can deliver the image in a pinch.

I repeated close-up tests with a tripod support to eliminate the potential adverse influence from hand-holding the lens. Using my AF 200 mm f/4 ED-IF Micro-Nikkor as a reference, the 300 PF Nikkor now delivered much better results. Not entirely up to a genuine Micro-Nikkor, but close enough for for most situations. However, it again proved imperative that VR should be turned off and you also should employ proper technique such as combining mirror lock-up and a cable release to capture the shot. For long exposures with a tripod-mounted lens, VR is likely to degrade the image by making blurs in one ('Normal' mode or two dimensions ('Sport' mode). For these tests, shutter speeds ranged from a 'fast' 1/8 sec to a 'slow' 0.8 sec.

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Two observations

1. Correcting axial CA well and then lateral CA less well, is that a new trend for lenses to be used on digital sensors. Is it a deliberate design decision on part of the lens designers, knowing that lateral CA can be fixed in post and that axial CA is more difficult to handle in post?

2. The E type electronic aperture doesn't preclude an aperture ring, since all of the PC-E lenses have one. Also Fuji and Panasonic make regular lenses with an aperture ring and electronic aperture.

Edited by bjornthun
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Guest nfoto

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Bjørn T:

 

I think the principle of reducing axial colour to the lowest possible level and let the software take care of any remaining lateral colour issues is a sensible one. Any good modern conversion programme can do the LCA removal quickly and efficiently. The main drawback is for the photographer who might be caught unprepared for the strong LCA evident when the NEF is opened.

 

As to the electronic aperture, what designs apply to other makers are not very relevant for Nikkors. I fail to see how a pure 'E' lens can in any possible way be fitted with an aperture ring and still be backwards compatible. The PC-E lenses operate their apertures and stopping down different from the ordinary Nikkors. However, *if* Nikon would indulge their customers and break all their apparent design targets from the last 30 years, I guess one could have 'E' Nikkors with an aperture ring. However, these still would not work with any older cameras so the chance of this happen is extremely small nay non-existing.

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I picked up one of these....amazingly light....pretty sweet with TC's attached!

 

Not had a chance to really try it yet.

 

Plan to give it a workout next week birding in Florida with Gerry and John... A little Safarian reunion

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Bjørn T:

 

I think the principle of reducing axial colour to the lowest possible level and let the software take care of any remaining lateral colour issues is a sensible one. Any good modern conversion programme can do the LCA removal quickly and efficiently. The main drawback is for the photographer who might be caught unprepared for the strong LCA evident when the NEF is opened.

 

I agree completely.

As to the electronic aperture, what designs apply to other makers are not very relevant for Nikkors. I fail to see how a pure 'E' lens can in any possible way be fitted with an aperture ring and still be backwards compatible. The PC-E lenses operate their apertures and stopping down different from the ordinary Nikkors. However, *if* Nikon would indulge their customers and break all their apparent design targets from the last 30 years, I guess one could have 'E' Nikkors with an aperture ring. However, these still would not work with any older cameras so the chance of this happen is extremely small nay non-existing.

I'm fully aware that adding an aperture ring to an E type lens won't make it any bit more backward compatible, but there are quite a few people who like that user interface. The appeal of direct controls of aperture, shutter is exactly what Fuji has picked up on, but I guess Nikon has gone the more "modern" route on that one.

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Guest nfoto

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Problem with adding an aperture ring on an E lens is people would expect it to work on any Nikon camera, which it won't. So the users will be utterly confused and that's something Nikon wants to avoid at all costs. If they added the mechanical interface to allow an E lens to work everywhere, they actually had lost all advantages of the E interface. So anyway you see this, it's a no-brainer.

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The aperture ring can be problematic for hand-held use of long lenses. A lot of people seem to object to the aperture ring because its use would mean the lens has to be supported by something other than the left hand while adjusting the aperture (depends of course on which position axially the aperture ring resides). I like the aperture ring for relatively compact lenses though. There seems to be a trend towards the requirement that most controls be accessible by only using the right hand. It is not my preference but nevertheless expressed by many. Of course, traditionally long lenses were supported by a tripod or monopod, but with VR, high ISO, and reduction in weight of the lens, there has been a move towards hand-held use of even very large and fairly heavy telephoto lenses.

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Guest nfoto

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A lens won't become more stable and easy to use just by being lighter .... On the contrary, it's better for a lens to have sufficient heft.

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Great review Bjorn, thanks for making this available.

 

When I bought my 400mmf2.8e fl I was a bit baffled by the "Sport"vr mode.

 

This is a link to the best explanation I can find from Nikon as to how it should be implemented

and used, some user tips for this function which I'm sure apples to all lenses with "sport" vr mode..................

 

 

http://nps.nikonimaging.com/technical_solutions/d4s_tips/the_af_s/

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An interview to Nikon engineers in charge of developing 300/4.0 PF ED E has been posted today:

 

http://dc.watch.impress.co.jp/docs/news/interview/20150306_688994.html

 

Sorry that it is in Japanes and too long to translate all of it.  The most part was to explain how the Phase Fresnel (PF) lens works and that how high the demand for a compact lens of this focal length was.   So, the essential points of interest are that:

 

1) The PF flare cannot be reduced by any lens coating becuase the mechanism of how the flare occurs is different.

2) The PF flare reduction in NX-D cannot FULLY reduce the PF flare, and won't even work at all under circumstances.

3) The flare can be partially reduced by stopping down the lens.

 

Other topics worth mentioning:

 

1) The lens is not dubbed as weather sealed, but the lens performed quite well during their environmental tests.

2) The electro-magnetic aperture functions better than the mechanical one when the continuous shooting mode of high frame rates is used and when the lens is combined with a teleconverter.

3) One problem of E lens is that the frame rate will be reduced to 9.5 fps when you use D4S in CH mode and stop down to f16.  (But I would doubt if there would be such occasions?)

4) They recommend AF-S mode when the lens is combined with x1.7 and x2.0 teleconverters.  WIth the x1.4 teleconverter, all AF modes can be used without any restrictions.

Edited by Akira
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Guest nfoto

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Initially I was pretty pessimistic about the Fresnel element causing excessive flare. However, I really have done my best to provoke bad flare and so far failed miserably. I won't give in that easily, though, so field testing continues.

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Thank you for this review.

I was waiting for this lens for around 2 years before I purchase a Nikon refurbished 300 F2.8 AF-S II, while I do not intend to rush out to purchase this lens, your review has been extremely helpful

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Guest Colin-M

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Thanks for this run through of the new 300mm Bjorn - much appreciated.

Both VR modes apparently get into action when the shutter release is pushed halfway down, whether or not AF is initiated by the release, and deactivate if you use AF-ON to focus.

A configuration that really does not make much sense to me and it defeats the purpose of the dedicated AF-ON control found on the better Nikon models..

Have I read this right? So with this lens, I can't keep AF-ON held (e.g. For when my subject is in motion and I want to be using AF-C mode) and also expect the VR to work?

Please tell me there's a setting somewhere that can be used to alter that?

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In D800 and newer cameras (also D4?) either the shutter button or AF-ON activates VR (to aid in stable focusing). In previous generation cameras, only the shutter button activated VR (but using AF-ON did not prevent it from functioning obviously). If this works differently with the 300mm PF then there must be a bug somewhere.

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Guest nfoto

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Only tried with my Df and there is no evidence AF-ON also triggers VR. When VR is activated (by lightly pressing the release) and and then continue with AF-ON, there is a 'clank' sound from the lens and apparently VR shuts off. I was quite surprised, but so far haven't been able to keep VR running concurrently with AF-ON operating. I would consider this behaviour a bug too. Perhaps I can put myself and the lens to a more taxing situation to be able to sort better what's going on.

 

Another problem using VR (Normal or Sport mode) and AF is that your focus can be jilted unintentionally if you first use AF-ON to get precise focus, then push the release which must trigger VR again and then focus can shift off the target. I was quite troubled with this doing hand-held close-ups with AF and VR both operating. Yes, I know this is a silly way of working in the close range, but that's what lens testing is all about: pushing the envelope.

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Just my take, but this new 300mm needs to be looked at in the context of the recent f/1.8 primes, the D610/D750 and even the D8xx series.  Nikon is trying to make FX lighter and more compact while increasing performance at the same time.  The technologies used in this new telephoto will be showing up elsewhere.  

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Guest Rosarian49

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There are a lot of complaints on the internet about VR problems with "middle" shutter speeds  (very long and very short shutter speeds apparently do not cause problems). Nikon Switzerland confirmed to me having received reports from customers about VR problems . Have you experienced any such problems?

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Guest nfoto

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I've seen, and reported here as well, double contours at 1/125 sec on close-up with VR Sport active. It's of course silly to shoot close-ups hand-held and rely on VR to gain vestiges of sharpness. A reliable tripod is the much better option. However, I didn't get the optional tripod collar so had no choice.

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Did you also see the same "partial blur" issue you had confirmed with the 80-400 zoom as well?  There should already be the plan to test that, too, though.

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Guest nfoto

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So far, not any trace of that strange partial banded blur pattern seen with the latest 80-400. However, do keep in mind the weather is atrocious at present and we hardly see sunshine, just drab skies, fog, rain, or sleet. Thus actual testing for the potential issue is not possible at this time.

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Guest Dlighter

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Had the chance to play with the PF and fell in love instantly. Also I added the phantastic collar from Rainer Burzynski and it looked and worked just great.

post-5318-0-11477600-1426004729_thumb.jp

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Guest Lowell

Posted (edited)

Aargh, still inclement weather. Thus the Moth Orchids in the window of my girl friend's home had to serve as test subjects for the close-up performance of the 300 PF. Nikon's data sheet specifies a reproduction ratio of 0.24x (approx. 1:4), which were the 300 a zoom lens would have netted it a 'Macro' designation.

However, one-fourth life-size is in no way true 'macro', so the 300 PF was saved from such disgrace. In common with most telephoto lenses, its performance drops at near range, as plainly seen in this capture of Phalaenopsis flowers. Shot at f/4, 1/250 sec ISO 400, with VR Normal activated. I tried this, and other flowers, using VR Sport mode, and had severe trouble getting focus accuracy because VR kicked in as soon as I touched the shutter release and jilted the focus off target. Besides, many of the shots (at 1/125 sec) had double contours to indicate VR-induced movement.

Download attachment: 300PF_Moth_orchid_DSC5385_v2BR.jpg

Thus, the 300 mm f/4 PF Nikkor is no substitute for a Micro-Nikkor or equivalent lens. But it can deliver the image in a pinch.

Click here to view the article

 

 

Bjorn,  Thanks for this information.  I do have a question about sharpness of this lens close up, e.g. around 1.5 mm.  I use the predecessor lens at this distance often.  If one replaces the foot with a Kirk collar, and uses a steady tripod, my AFS 300 F/4 is really quite sharp from F/5.6 to F/8 and at close up distances.  I would certainly appreciate greatly any more observations at these close distances.  If it doesn't perform really quite well at 1.5 - 2 m, then its pretty much a non starter for me.  Hope the weather changes for the better.

 

Thanks, Lowell

Edited by Lowell

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Guest nfoto

Posted

I'll keep your suggestions in mind, Lowell. Cannot be bleak, drizzly, and dreary slate-grey wet skies all days (well,  it certainly can, but one is allowed a spark of hope).

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      El Dorado Motel - Fort Worth, Texas
       

       
       
      NW 4th Street - Fort Worth, Texas
       

       
       
      Main Street - Dallas, Texas
       

       
       
      Pegasus Plaza - Dallas, Texas
       

       
    • By Rick Waldroup
      In my seemingly never ending quest for smaller and lighter gear for my street photography, I recently acquired a slightly used Nikon Coolpix A compact camera.  I had previously been shooting with M4/3 gear, specifically Panasonic cameras.
       
      The A was introduced in June 2013.  It features an APS-C DX 16.2 megapixel sensor in a very small, compact package.  It comes with a fixed 28mm (35mm equivalent) f/2.8 lens.  The camera has a shutter speed range of 30 seconds to 1/2000 and the ISO can be set from 100 to 6400, with two extensions available- 12,800 and 25,600.  While I rarely shoot anything beyond 3200,  I have tried the 12,800 setting and the results were really astonishing- very clean and usable images.  My settings for the camera are the same ones I have used on all film and digital cameras I have used in the past- I shoot in aperture priority with center-weighted metering.  I set the lens to autofocus about 50% of the time.  The rest of the time I switch the lens to manual focus, set the lens to f/11,  and zone focus by manually focusing the lens on an object about 6 feet away- anything from about 4 feet away and beyond is in focus.  
       
      The biggest adjustment I had to make when I first got the camera was learning to use a screen to compose the shots with instead of some sort of viewfinder.  In the past I had always used some type of viewfinder, whether it be optical or electronic.  Plus, in very bright sunlight, the screen on the back of the camera can be difficult to use, so I promptly purchased an Xpro Viewfinder III for the camera.  This is an extremely well-made optical bright-line viewfinder with markings for 28, 35, and 45mm lenses.  This viewfinder is a real bargain compared to the Nikon viewfinder, which can cost as much as $300.00.  The XPro viewfinder is approximately $75.00.  I also added a Nikon lens hood which snaps into a ring that surrounds the lens.
       
      Using the camera on the streets has truly been a liberating experience.  The fixed 28mm lens is just about perfect for street photography.  I tend to compose the shots a bit differently than I had previously and the small, compact size of the camera means that I virtually take it with me everywhere I go.  A lot of times, I do not carry any type of bag or pouch for the camera- I simply hang the camera around my neck (something I never did previously), stuff an extra battery and memory card in my pocket, and then I am off to explore and see what I can find.
       
      In the next few weeks I will be publishing an article about another type of camera I will be experimenting with- street photography using a large format 8x10 pinhole film camera.  I will be scanning the 8x10 black-and-white contact prints using an Epson flat-bed scanner.  I do not know what the results are going to be using such a large and slow camera for street photography, but I do know one thing- it should be a lot of fun.  Stay tuned for the results. 
       
      Pacific Street - Dallas, Texas
       

       
       
      Elm Street - Dallas, Texas
       

       
       
      Animas Street - Trinidad, Colorado
       

       
       
      The Eye - Commerce Street - Dallas, Texas
       

       
       
      Houston Street - Dallas, Texas
       

       
       
      El Dorado Motel - Fort Worth, Texas
       

       
       
      NW 4th Street - Fort Worth, Texas
       

       
       
      Main Street - Dallas, Texas
       

       
       
      Pegasus Plaza - Dallas, Texas
       

       

      View full article
    • By Dallas
      So Nikon has announced they will bring in the new professional mirrorless camera with a new mount and adaptability to F mount lenses. I don't think they had any choice in the matter, to be honest. 
       
      I think we will see a couple of new mirrorless bodies. There will probably be a flagship and a prosumer grade body. I reckon the flagship will most likely have the designation of DM-1 and the prosumer most likely a DM-300 or something along those lines. 
       
      Hopefully they will have designed something that inspires the competition to up their game too, but based on recent pricing of models such as the D5, I reckon we can expect a wince when the prices are announced, which will leave ample room for the competitors like MFT, Sony and Fuji to compete well. 
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