Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  

Olympus 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO Does A Wedding


Dallas

On Saturday I was in attendance at my niece Storm's wedding to Luca, which was held at a lovely riverside lawn venue in the Natal Midlands. The weather was perfect, the bride was beautiful and everything went off without a hitch.

 

I wasn't the photographer for this gig. Everyone in my family knows that I am not a wedding photographer, but I will take casual photos if they ask me. The thing with me and weddings is that I actually find the whole process too stilted and contrived, especially modern wedding photography, so while I am happy to take photos on the day, just don't ask me to engineer these Vogue styled fashion photographs. I don't have that in my repertoire and have no plans of doing so. Snapshots and reportage of the event? No problem. I'm so used to doing that at conferences that it comes quite naturally to me.

 

So, Olympus have kindly loaned me a bunch of equipment to use on my first bush workshop which is happening this coming weekend (24-26 April). Included in this bunch of gear is the EM-5 Mk II and the new 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO. I was asked by my sister-in-law if I could do a video of Storm coming down the terrace on her horse because they didn't have anybody to do an official video. I said, sure, no problem. I can do that. I also volunteered to film the ceremony by putting the EM-5 on a tripod. I used the 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO as the lens on that body and with a couple of other EM-1 bodies did some stills while the video was taking care of itself.

 

On the one E-M1 I had the new 40-150/2.8 PRO. This is a really, really, really terrific lens for wedding photography. It's got the great image quality, the reach, proximity focus, you name it. I took quite a few shots with it and can't find fault with this lens in any way. The only thing I could possibly nit-pick about is that the out of focus areas are not as smooth as I would like. But that is not to say that they are bad, they're not. I have used telezooms from Nikon and Canon with similar bokeh, so I guess it's just inherent to a complicated lens design. The best thing about this lens is that it's lightweight and yet it offers so much versatility. You can take off the hood and the tripod mount and it looks not much bigger than a Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8, yet it gives you an equivalent 80-300mm f/2.8 zoom range. And it can focus at under 1 meter. Ridiculously amazing lens that is indispensable to any photographer shooting with micro four thirds.

 

I have to state that this was probably the worst possible lighting for an outdoor wedding. It was bright and sunny and it took place at 11am, plus most of the time I had the sun behind the subject. Our sun is slowly moving northwards as we press on into winter here in South Africa, but it's still quite intense, so when people are facing towards it they are going to be squinting. Ideally I should have used some fill flash, but because I was not the official photographer I just did my own thing and hoped for the best. Judging by the number of likes I got on Facebook from friends and relatives I think I did OK. Will I consider doing wedding photography as a business? I don't think so, but if I owned this kind of gear I certainly wouldn't have any problems doing it.

 

Here are a few shots from the day. Click to view larger version.

 

gallery_2_394_139478.jpg

 

The beautiful bride!

 

gallery_2_394_520942.jpg

 

Tearful father of the bride.

 

gallery_2_394_467777.jpg

 

The ceremony.

 

gallery_2_394_1013214.jpg

 

Exchanging of the rings (I should have been a bit more centre-on for this shot but I wanted to get Storm's facial expression).

 

gallery_2_394_1515939.jpg

 

Signing the register.

 

gallery_2_394_1043685.jpg

 

The best men (Luca's brothers - that bow tie in the beard was a hoot!).

 

gallery_2_394_259820.jpg

 

My son playing the guitar for the hymn they sung.

 

gallery_2_394_531892.jpg

 

The all important kiss! They did this only after signing the register, which I found a little odd.

 

gallery_2_394_958179.jpg

 

Returning from the "official"photoshoot.

 

gallery_2_394_917474.jpg

 

Celebrating with cousins!

 

gallery_2_394_890115.jpg

 

My sons getting in on the celebrating! OK, this last one was with the 12-40/2.8 PRO which is just as good as the bigger brother. A perfect combo for the wedding photographer.

Edited by DDFZ

  • Like 1
Sign in to follow this  


Comments

Recommended Comments

Great shots!

These are the best kind of wedding shots - the informal, candid family shots.....

 

Thanks Fred! I agree, these are the kinds of photos that married couples will look at years, maybe decades from today and truly appreciate. If I could convince all the brides-to-be looking for photographers to shoot their weddings that all the horsing around with props and gimmicks and smoke machines and high fashion poses is a waste of time, I might be quite happy to shoot weddings for money. 

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Great series of images Dallas. The images show the wedding was a relaxed gathering of family and friends and this obviously had a positive effect on your photography. Well done!

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

You are great at shooting people gatherings, and it really shows in this set of shots

 

Made me wish I had  this sort of shots from my own wedding. I have the formal shoots, and a bunch of crappy images from a few friends (pre digital age)

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is good stuff, Dallas.

I wonder if there might not be a market for a secondary 'snapshot' photographer at weddings?

  • Like 2

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

This is good stuff, Dallas.

I wonder if there might not be a market for a secondary 'snapshot' photographer at weddings?

 

I offer this from time to time if the client wants it, but I control the staff for this.  That way we never have to worry about paid photographers competing for "the shot".

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks! 

 

I think it's different when I'm doing this for family as opposed to doing it for strangers. A couple of things that put weddings a bit out of my comfort zone are firstly the fact that they mostly happen on Saturdays, which is time I like to spend with my family, and secondly that they are usually booked long in advance. A lot of people start planning weddings a year in advance, which for me is just not a feasible thing. Anything can happen between the time of booking and the actual event, which kind of opens you up to all sorts of risks. I'm also finding myself wanting to do less paid photography these days and concentrate on photo safaris and workshops, which is where my real passion lies. 

  • Like 2

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Weddings are high stress for sure.   The majority of the time, you only get one shot to get "the shot" and there are clients that don't tell you exactly what they plan to do for each one.

 

It's not my favorite thing to do because of that, but they are one of the few things that still pays pretty well.

My biggest issue is that a lot of people are looking for video and stills.  Since I'm a "one man band" that can make the sell to the client a little difficult.  I'm not in a financial position to get that many more cameras and hire the people with the expertise to staff them.

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Having shot more than my fair share's worth of weddings between 1971 and 2011 (yikes! - that's 40 years, suddenly feeling old here), I have to say the demise in both demand and the willingness to pay for the service around here is only lamented for the loss in income that brought.

 

If no-one ever asks about a booking again I will not be unhappy all the same, even though my kit has more than halved in weight and the attendant workout involved lugging everything at a half-trot for 12 hours or more wouldn't be quite so painful and wearying as it was with SLRs and DSLRs, or when I carried a Hasselblad outfit as well as the Nikons, or before that RB67, or before that a 5x4 to accompany the medium format stuff (when a few large format B&W pics were popular additions) when 35mm was simply unacceptable to be used at weddings. 645 was the minimum standard, and 30-40 rolls of 120 or 220 film was not an uncommon drop off to the colour lab on Monday morning.

 

The difficulty in producing the inevitably required Wedding Magazine-type setup shots in the equally inevitably harsh light of clear Australian skies in summer on days often hovering around 40°C (over 100°F) is also something I'm not missing - Easter being the traditional end to the wedding season just when the light was approaching half-decent quality as the southern autumn gained hold.

 

Weddings were simply bloody hard work, no question about it, and the perception of them being well-paid was, and still is rather a misnomer given the work and stress involved.

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dallas,

after seeing this thread and looking through the additional images in your link,

I'd say it was a real success.

I'm sure your friends and family will appreciate the effort, there are many great images to see

and I don't even know the folks involved, just one of those very special days 

we'd all treasure!

 

Oh yeah, the bride looks pretty hot too, lol.

 

Excellent work, well done. 

Edited by wildoat

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dallas, well done, great candids :) .  I bought the 40-150 2.8 as an alternative to the 70-200 2.8vr for travel but you've proved the FL, combined with the 12-40 (and maybe the 75 1.8  :wink: )  and multiple bodies  covers a wedding very well.  So , are you going to get to try the 7-14 2.8 :)  ?

Cheers,

Tom

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Andrew, I have been thinking very seriously about offering video for weddings as my stills work drys up around here. I think that it is a lot easier to get right than wedding stills and much less stressful as you are not engineering any of the material. The hardest part is the editing afterwards, which I am happy to outsource to a friend who is now doing the video editing for the Rock Academy website I built earlier this year. He seems to enjoy doing it and its really quite basic if you think about it. 

 

I could also offer additional stills in a candid style similar to that which I have shown here. I think people might buy that as a service. I noticed on the E-M5 II that you can set it up to take JPG 16:9 stills while you are filming and it doesn't interrupt the process at all. Hmm...

 

Tony, thanks. Storm has always been a hottie, but she has brains too. She is just finishing up her thesis in chiropractic and will then have her doctorate. 

 

Tommie, I probably will get the 7-14/PRO at some point. With those three PRO lenses (7-14/12-40/40-150) you can do almost everything photographically. 

 

Thanks for all your positive comments, folks - very much appreciated. :) 

  • Like 1

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites

Andrew, I have been thinking very seriously about offering video for weddings as my stills work drys up around here. I think that it is a lot easier to get right than wedding stills and much less stressful as you are not engineering any of the material. The hardest part is the editing afterwards, which I am happy to outsource to a friend who is now doing the video editing for the Rock Academy website I built earlier this year. He seems to enjoy doing it and its really quite basic if you think about it. 

 

I could also offer additional stills in a candid style similar to that which I have shown here. I think people might buy that as a service. I noticed on the E-M5 II that you can set it up to take JPG 16:9 stills while you are filming and it doesn't interrupt the process at all. Hmm...

 

Tony, thanks. Storm has always been a hottie, but she has brains too. She is just finishing up her thesis in chiropractic and will then have her doctorate. 

 

Tommie, I probably will get the 7-14/PRO at some point. With those three PRO lenses (7-14/12-40/40-150) you can do almost everything photographically. 

 

Thanks for all your positive comments, folks - very much appreciated. :)

 

If you can make it work then that is great.

 

I'm still on the fence about video at this point.  Just not sure that it is 100% for me.  I still have quite a bit of experimentation I need to do.

Share this comment


Link to comment
Share on other sites


Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Join Our Small Community

    Like what you see on Fotozones? Why not join up and make friends with like-minded photography enthusiasts from all across the planet. We are limiting our membership to no more than 2000 individuals, so if you are seeing this message there is still space available for you to join. We'd love to have you along. :)  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By visiting this website you are agreeing to our Terms of Use, Privacy Policy & Guidelines.