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▶︎ Special Features Of The Olympus FL-600R Flash


Dallas
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A couple of people have asked me to make a video about some of the more advanced features of the Olympus Flash system. 

 

In this video I take a very quick look at a few of the features I find most useful. If you have any questions about the video, the flash or Olympus in general, please post them in the comments and I will do my best to help you. 

 

 



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