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Analysis of the DxOMark Camera Sensor in Luminous Landscape

dxomark luminous landscape peter van den hamer

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8 replies to this topic

#1 Larry

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 19:41

Peter van den Hamer examines the DxOMark Camera Sensor test in Luminous Landscape

http://www.luminous-..._cameras2.shtml

Edited by Larry, 18 December 2012 - 19:42 .


#2 Andrea B.

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 22:43

I read quite a bit of it, but got a little bogged down 'cause I was tired from editing. I'm going to try again!
It is good to have these technical analyses to figure out our personal compromises when choosing a new camera or lens.

I'm deeply fascinated by both the technical and artistic side of photography.
I guess that makes me some kind of gear-head air-head. :D :D :D :D :D
  • Elsa Hoffmann likes this

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#3 schwett

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 22:50

very interesting. thanks for posting the link.

the basic truth revealed by this benchmark is that you can't compare between images of different resolution at a pixel by pixel level. for a real comparison, you have to compare things that have been resized to match. resample a d800/e image to 12 megapixels and compare it to a d3s image and you quickly see how silly any complaint about the sharpness/noise/color/etc of the latest cameras is. we've come a long way!
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#4 Pa

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 22:54

A rather technical but very informative article. Thanks for alerting us to this.

#5 Tom

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 21:44

A very balanced article that makes a lot of things clear about DxOmark's measurements.
Gordon Laing's review of the D800 noise/resolution at downsampled output-sizes confirmes that per-pixel noise comparison is almost irrelevant.

Edited by Tom, 16 January 2013 - 21:58 .

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#6 retief

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Posted 16 January 2013 - 23:23

What a super article, and now I am also going to have to look up Gardon Laing's review noted by Tom. Owning a D800 and a D600, I was pretty darned happy with this article, until I came to this line:

"And high resolution numbers also helps impress your (male) friends at the bar"

Now, I'm just not sure anymore, does this mean I have to start going to a bar and finding some male friends??????
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#7 Larry

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:33

:D ... Bill, now having both, which one do you prefer for what use?

Edited by Larry, 17 January 2013 - 06:35 .


#8 Elsa Hoffmann

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 06:48

Andrea I am with you in the "interested in tech and photo..." thing

thanks for the link - reading matter for tonight.
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#9 Larry

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Posted 17 January 2013 - 09:57


very interesting. thanks for posting the link.

the basic truth revealed by this benchmark is that you can't compare between images of different resolution at a pixel by pixel level. for a real comparison, you have to compare things that have been resized to match. resample a d800/e image to 12 megapixels and compare it to a d3s image and you quickly see how silly any complaint about the sharpness/noise/color/etc of the latest cameras is. we've come a long way!



A very balanced article that makes a lot of things clear about DxOmark's measurements.
Gordon Laing's review of the D800 noise/resolution at downsampled output-sizes confirmes that per-pixel noise comparison is almost irrelevant.


Indeed. I do also look at the "Screen" measurements as this is helpful in understanding what the result would be if substantial cropping is needed. Viewed at this level, the D3/D700 is quite close to the D4 until ISO 6400 except in DR and in terms of the D4's 4mp resolution advantage. With a longer lens, the D3/D700 comes close to the D4's performance (except in DR) if the D4 was used with a wider lens and then had the 16mp image cropped to 12mp equivalent of the D3/D700.

Edited by Larry, 17 January 2013 - 10:09 .






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