Jump to content




The above adverts really do help Fotozones. Please click on them if they are relevant to you. Not seeing them? Just exclude Fotozones from your ad blocker. Thanks!


Photo

How to mount paper prints ?


  • Please log in to reply
41 replies to this topic

#1 armando_m

armando_m

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 3,196 posts
  • LocationGuadalajara

Posted 27 August 2012 - 18:39

I mounted a few prints but my method didn't last long ...

I used a foam cardboard , it seems to be 2 thick white papers with foam in the middle, sorry I do not know the name of it, I think it is convenient because it is rigid and light

Got some "artist cement" it says on the can "used to mount photos and posters", quite nice, because when dry it can be peeled of in case you get some where your are not supposed to have it , and also the paper can be re-positioned quite easily if needed, once dry it doesn't move

Problem is , the prints are becoming undulated, not terribly so, but I do not like it

the prints are on Epson Enhanced matte paper

problem is apparent on large and small prints,

I'll need to redo the prints, but I want it to last longer than 2 weeks looking good :)

At least these are in my house not in any exposition

I'll appreciate any suggestions or pointers you may have
  • Rags likes this

Regards,
Armando 
 


#2 afx

afx

    Advanced Member

  • Moderators
  • 5,416 posts
  • LocationMunich, Germany
  • Edit my pics?:Yes

Posted 27 August 2012 - 20:43

I use Kappafix (a foamcore board). Works like a charm.
http://www.3acomposi...ex.php?cmd=2#14
It has one adhesive surface which is actually easy to use with a bit of practice.

cheers
afx
"Patriotism is the virtue of the vicious" - Oscar Wilde
"They that can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety." - Benjamin Franklin
My latest book: The AfterShot Survival Guide  
sRGB clipping sucks and Adobe RGB is just as bad  Still no clue how to take decent pictures though, see afximages.com ;-(

#3 Alan7140

Alan7140

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 5,621 posts
  • LocationTasmania, Australia
  • Edit my pics?:Ask Me

Posted 27 August 2012 - 22:57

It's impractical for casual mounting, but the most secure, long-term way of mounting prints flat is heat dry mounting in a proper press (such as Ademco used to make). This uses a heat-sensitive adhesive impregnated into tissue which is tacked onto both the print in the middle and the mount at two corners and then placed in the heated press under pressure. The adhesive melts and transfers to the mount and print, bonding the two permanently. You might find a picture framer who still uses this method to help you, or its modern equivalent - the heat vacuum press. Either way, this method is much more permanent than the alternative cold press pressure adhesive or the wet adhesive cold vacuum press method, both of which have their risks and problems during mounting, and the pressure adhesive having long-term durability problems.

#4 Ann

Ann

    Professional Photographer

  • Life Member
  • 10,160 posts
  • LocationNew York State
  • Edit my pics?:No

Posted 28 August 2012 - 02:44

It seems that Admeco was taken over by Seal some years ago and the presses are now sold by Seal/Bienfang.

They are expensive but you might find older ones from Ademco or Seal on e-Bay.

#5 Carolyn

Carolyn

    Seeker

  • Life Member
  • 4,836 posts
  • LocationUtah, Mexico and California
  • Edit my pics?:Ask Me

Posted 28 August 2012 - 04:31

It really depends on your end use. All my prints get a museum mount which consist of:
Print attached to 100% cotton rag mat board with hand torn (no cut edges) rice paper corners. Those are attached to the mat board, and hold the print in place. Not too tight. Not to loose. The purpose here is to allow the print to *float* and expand/contract due to changes in humidity.
Then, an window mat - again 100% cotton rag, and that *package* is sealed. Now the print can be removed by simply removing 2 corners, and information on the back of the print (always in the borders - not directly behind the print) can be accessed.

Then, this *package* is placed inside the moulding, foam core (acid/lignen free) added behind, then sealed across the back with acid free paper.

Glass is personal preference. I use Tru Vue museum glass for special prints, and recommend customers use it if they can afford to, however for all my gallery exhibit framing, I just use Tru Vue UV glass.

I follow museum conservation framing according to and taught by Wilhelm. I shouldn't say *I*, because *I* never do this. I have it done. And fortunately my framers give me a 40-50% discount, or it would become cost prohibitive.

However, you can use corners, and learn to *fit* them correctly. It really helps to have a large border around the print (I have 2" borders) as this allows you to use larger corners, and it is all held together better with the window mat. If you don't need conservation framing, you can even purchase pre-made corners.

T-Hinging is another method, however over time, chances one side will work loose, and the print will slip are high. I just used for a short term... it's OK.... you are however, introducing an adhesive to the back of your photograph.
  • azrockitman likes this
International Member

"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer it has chosen" Minor White

www.carolynguild.com

#6 Alan7140

Alan7140

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 5,621 posts
  • LocationTasmania, Australia
  • Edit my pics?:Ask Me

Posted 28 August 2012 - 04:43

Perfection indeed, Carolyn, but I took Armando as wanting to mount his prints flat on board - hinging or corners are fine under mat & glass, but a bit unstable blowin' in the wind, as it were... :)

#7 Carolyn

Carolyn

    Seeker

  • Life Member
  • 4,836 posts
  • LocationUtah, Mexico and California
  • Edit my pics?:Ask Me

Posted 28 August 2012 - 04:55

I just thought I'd add another point of view..... just like printing/post processing/shooting..... desired end result can lead us many directions... I guess I really just didn't understand that he wanted the photograph mounted without window mat boards. Duh.....

Edited by Carolyn, 28 August 2012 - 13:59 .

International Member

"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer it has chosen" Minor White

www.carolynguild.com

#8 Alan7140

Alan7140

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 5,621 posts
  • LocationTasmania, Australia
  • Edit my pics?:Ask Me

Posted 28 August 2012 - 08:07

Certainly no harm done, Carolyn. It might help give some who don't know a better understanding of what is involved with framing on a conservation level, and to that end why properly framed photographs or art work can appear expensive in dollar terms.

#9 Rags

Rags

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 4,488 posts

Posted 28 August 2012 - 14:25

I just thought I'd add another point of view..... just like printing/post processing/shooting..... desired end result can lead us many directions... I guess I really just didn't understand that he wanted the photograph mounted without window mat boards. Duh.....


I confess, that I'm happy you misunderstood. I learned something today...... :)

Rags

#10 armando_m

armando_m

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 3,196 posts
  • LocationGuadalajara

Posted 28 August 2012 - 15:02

Thank you very much for all the opinions and detailed descriptions of the mounting process

The kind of professional mounting mentioned I will likely leave it to someone with the right equipment, I do not have the space, desire or volume to justify buying a press.

I have to learn to avoid skimping steps when starting something new, for I have done that multiple times and I end up paying more money than if I do it right from the beginning, be it buying camera bodies , lenses, etc ...

The prints I did were done on an epson printer capable of printing on 110cms wide paper, this was done for free as a demonstration, the salesman is enticing me to buy an epson 3880 printer, and I'm very tempted to get it, but first I have to resolve the mounting of the prints

I had prints displayed on cheap commercial frames, the kind you can but at any store, this worked for years with no problems , the print is held by the edges and a thick material in the back, with glass in the front, this has produced no ondulations on the paper, while I do not like the glass in front of the print, this cheap method has kept the prints flat and protected, while it has not been for anything larger than 8" x 10" it seem to work fine

This time around I wanted to have the prints with no glass , no frame , displayed bare in order to appreciate them better, also, I wanted to avoid the cookie cutter sizes, this attracted me to glue the prints to the foam board ...

I'm rambling here ... again thanks for the comments, you got me thinking

Regards,
Armando 
 


#11 Bart Willems

Bart Willems

    Forum troglodyte

  • Life Member
  • 3,011 posts
  • LocationElmwood Park, NJ
  • Edit my pics?:Ask Me

Posted 28 August 2012 - 16:01

Armando, some time ago I posted a video about dry mounting using a regular iron. Using a press is better, but it is a cheap way of getting familiar with the process, and it works quite well for me.

Edited by Bart Willems, 28 August 2012 - 16:02 .

Bart

Too much gear, not enough common sense!
Flickr and Zenfolio, too!

#12 armando_m

armando_m

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 3,196 posts
  • LocationGuadalajara

Posted 28 August 2012 - 16:21

thanks Bart, nice video, and good music too :)

Regards,
Armando 
 


#13 Ann

Ann

    Professional Photographer

  • Life Member
  • 10,160 posts
  • LocationNew York State
  • Edit my pics?:No

Posted 28 August 2012 - 16:24

I used a domestic iron in the days before I had a Press and it does work on smaller prints.

I used to heat a curved nail-removal tool in the electric ring on the stove to use as a tacking-iron so that I wouldn't get the shellac from the mounting tissue stuck onto the bottom of the household's iron.

Electric Tacking irons are not expensive and these also appear on eBay from time to time. Seal made a good thermostatically-controlled one.

#14 Alan7140

Alan7140

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 5,621 posts
  • LocationTasmania, Australia
  • Edit my pics?:Ask Me

Posted 29 August 2012 - 03:03

I also suggested heat dry mounting as there still might be a few presses available second-hand - when the framing world migrated to vacuum presses (both cold and hot) an awful lot of large dry mount presses became redundant. Framers often have works much bigger than the usual large size of 25x21" that commercial presses were made in, and thus things required two or more bites to mount. The hazard there was very real in that a ridge could very well be left in the mounted work if the spreader sheet was positioned incorrectly to diffuse the sharp edge of the upper platen or the platen screwed down too tightly. Most commonly photographs are smaller than 25x21", or if larger still only require two bites of the press to mount, making this form of mounting very suitable for photographs.

Expense need not come into it - admittedly it was 17 years ago, but I picked up one such large Ademco press from a framer (I spotted it gathering dust under a bench) for a token $50.00, including 2,000 sheets of both shellac and reversible 20x16 dry mount tissue and 1,000 sheets of hot laminating film. In other words, he basically paid me to take it :) . It is still working fine and while mounting fiber-based baryta prints was always a bit hazardous (the larger sizes had a tendency to dry with slightly wavy edges which could turn into sharply defined creases if the press wheel was turned down carelessly), for inkjet prints on any paper it is just the best thing. 20 secs to mount at 90-100ºC using reversible tissue, and the surface is always dead smooth and flat, and because there's no gelatin binder as with photographic paper there is little chance of the front surface sticking to the platen should the release paper not be positioned correctly. Removing a gelatin print from such an accident was a real chore, and the upper platen was never the same afterwards.

#15 Rags

Rags

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 4,488 posts

Posted 30 August 2012 - 15:09

Interesting mounting experiences.

But why mount? Why not print on a larger sheet of paper

Do you overlap the matte on the print edge?

Does that devalue print?

Affect viewing?

Rags

#16 armando_m

armando_m

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 3,196 posts
  • LocationGuadalajara

Posted 30 August 2012 - 15:47

Interesting mounting experiences.

But why mount? Why not print on a larger sheet of paper

Do you overlap the matte on the print edge?

Does that devalue print?

Affect viewing?

Rags

why ?
I do not know of any other way to display printed work than to mount it on something that allow the image to be hang on the wall

maybe "mount" is the wrong term ?

Regards,
Armando 
 


#17 Rags

Rags

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 4,488 posts

Posted 30 August 2012 - 16:20

why ?
I do not know of any other way to display printed work than to mount it on something that allow the image to be hang on the wall

maybe "mount" is the wrong term ?


If it's in a frame and there is a matte in front any board can be used behind, if it's on a paper size the same as the the inside frame, it won't slip, curl.

rags

#18 Ann

Ann

    Professional Photographer

  • Life Member
  • 10,160 posts
  • LocationNew York State
  • Edit my pics?:No

Posted 30 August 2012 - 16:32

There are many needs for mounted prints including Expos, Trade Shows and as components in a Museum exhibition where the prints need to be mounted on Foamcore for portability, lightness and ease of hanging. These are never glazed and are usually more than 20" x 16" (often MUCH more!).

Also, seldom does a standard ready-made frame-size fit the most appropriate Crop for the picture in question.
  • armando_m likes this

#19 Carolyn

Carolyn

    Seeker

  • Life Member
  • 4,836 posts
  • LocationUtah, Mexico and California
  • Edit my pics?:Ask Me

Posted 30 August 2012 - 16:37

If it's in a frame and there is a matte in front any board can be used behind, if it's on a paper size the same as the the inside frame, it won't slip, curl.

rags

You can't use *any* board if you are worried about permanence... And a print can and will still *ripple* under many circumstances...
Too much ink on paper
Too much humidity, print *fixed* to mat board
particularly on thinner papers and less expensive (as in cheap) papers
Corners used, put on too tightly
etc...
International Member

"No matter how slow the film, Spirit always stands still long enough for the photographer it has chosen" Minor White

www.carolynguild.com

#20 Rags

Rags

    Advanced Member

  • Life Member
  • 4,488 posts

Posted 30 August 2012 - 17:23

There are many needs for mounted prints including Expos, Trade Shows and as components in a Museum exhibition where the prints need to be mounted on Foamcore for portability, lightness and ease of hanging. These are never glazed and are usually more than 20" x 16" (often MUCH more!).

Also, seldom does a standard ready-made frame-size fit the most appropriate Crop for the picture in question.


Gotcha...

Do you hang the foam core or put it in a frame. On the larger sizes, how do you dress the edges




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users





The above adverts really do help Fotozones. Please click on them if they are relevant to you. Not seeing them? Just exclude Fotozones from your ad blocker. Thanks!


An appeal to all Fotozones visitors: please help me to keep this site going by starting your gear purchases using any one of the affiliate links shown below:

Amazon.com | Amazon.co.uk | Amazon.de | Adorama.com | thinkTank Photo | DigitalRev.com | OWC | B&H or Donate via PayPal

Starting your shopping here doesn't cost you anything more, but by using the links above (or any others found on the site) you are advising the affiliate that you support this website. This results in a small commission that helps with the running costs. If your preferred outlet isn't among those listed above you can also support the site by making a donation of any amount via PayPal (no PayPal account required). Any donation will be most appreciated.