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Gannet


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#1 FullShilling

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 09:50

Gannet coming into land at Bempton Cliffs.

D700, 80-200 AF-D@200mm, f/8, 1/1000sec.

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#2 Anthony

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 10:59

Nice catch. I wonder if a bit of pp could make the bird stand out a bit more.

#3 FullShilling

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 11:28

Anthony,

thanks for the comment.

What do you mean by PP?, post processing?

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#4 Mike G

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 11:48

Alan very well timed, just a pity you clipped the tail.
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#5 Anthony

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 17:38

What do you mean by PP?, post processing?

Alan.


Yes, sorry for the jargon.

#6 FullShilling

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Posted 30 June 2012 - 18:05

Anthony,

I'm always open to advice, I don't know that much about Photoshop(Im on CS3), what edits would you recommend?

Alan.
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#7 Anthony

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 12:49

Alan

There are many more qualified to advise than I am, but since you ask, what I would do is reduce the exposure of the background, increase the exposure of the gannet (delicately so as to avoid losing the feather detail) and slightly reduce the exposure of the head of the bird. I might selectively reduce the exposure of some of the shadow detail on the bird. I would then sharpen the bird.

I do not know what raw convertor you use, but it should be possible to do all of this there.

In CS6 I would reduce the background exposure by creating a new Levels adjustment layer, choosing blend mode Multiply (which darkens by one stop), apply a Mask filled with black and then paint in the darkening effect with a white brush, using a low opacity such as 20% so as to build up the darkening effect gradually. To increase the exposure I would do the same, but using blend mode Screen, which increases exposure by one stop. Effectively this is burning and dodging (stupid expressions, based on darkroom techniques that most photographers have never used). It is a chore to go through this step by step every time, so I have created a couple of Actions, one named Darken Brush and one named Lighten Brush (so I don't have to remember which is dodging and which is burning). You can use the same technique for selective High Pass sharpening.

If you like I can show you a quick and dirty edit on your gannet, just to illustrate my thoughts.

#8 FullShilling

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 13:53

Anthony,

"If you like I can show you a quick and dirty edit on your gannet, just to illustrate my thoughts."

Go for it.

Alan.
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#9 Anthony

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Posted 01 July 2012 - 21:17

OK, here it is (with some diffidence). The selection of the areas to be darkened needs a bit more work to tidy it up. You may also find some of it a bit overcooked. But that is easy to adjust to taste.

Attached Files


Edited by Anthony, 01 July 2012 - 21:56 .





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