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New York Institute of Photography


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#1 Nicolas

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 23:10

Do you know anyone that used the professional photographer course from the New York Institute of Photography? What's the feeling about that course?

To make a real short story, I need to learn something in a structured way. I love the fact they critique the work done after few units. The fact that I need to follow some directives is sort of compelling. I'm sure to learn something new; enough to cover the 1000$... I'm confident I should. Up until few weeks ago, I never really looked at portraiture, studio work; I never contemplated doing weddings. Just with these two subjects, I'm sure to learn something.

Usually, I'm really into reading by myself and testing it out there; but I have the feeling I might love that kind of learning.

So any comments about that place?

#2 nfoto

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Posted 22 January 2013 - 23:37

They have been around for a long time. I never heard any pro photographer telling he or she had taken that course.
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#3 Dallas

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 05:13

I think that you will learn a lot more just by being online and asking questions about things that you need better clarity on. There are a lot of places where you will be able to get help without having to follow any pre-conceived notions of what photography ought to be and how you should be doing it.

One good thing about doing a course though is that it gets you to commit your time and resources to it, whereas if you are floating around you might not get the drive you need.

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#4 nfoto

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 08:43

Define a project for yourself and carry it out. That'll teach you how to do photography for real. Never mind what it is, the point is that you specify a target vision and try to achieve it one way or other.
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#5 Nicolas

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 11:58

Thank you guys, after much thoughts about that yesterday; I ended up with pretty much the same conclusion.

I think that you will learn a lot more just by being online and asking questions about things that you need better clarity on. There are a lot of places where you will be able to get help without having to follow any pre-conceived notions of what photography ought to be and how you should be doing it.


That's what I'm doing usually. I have been reading this forum for some years now, lately I joined some groups that get together a few time a year to shoot, and I have bought videos and books on specific subjects.

One good thing about doing a course though is that it gets you to commit your time and resources to it, whereas if you are floating around you might not get the drive you need.


That is exactly what was tempting by that course. Tempted enough to spend 1000$ usd and follow a course that takes an average of 10 months to complete? I'll keep my current method and focus on specific subject.

Define a project for yourself and carry it out. That'll teach you how to do photography for real. Never mind what it is, the point is that you specify a target vision and try to achieve it one way or other.


I definitely love that idea; I know in the past few months I saw you talked about giving yourself project. If I remember correctly at the end of the "Picture a week" challenge you mentioned one and now your new year resolution! I'll try to find something suited for me now!


Now, back to my books ;) Thank you again!

#6 Elsa Hoffmann

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 12:10

a couple of years ago - probably 4 or so - a friend of mone was busy doing a course thru them.
It was old fashioned - the study material looked like it was 19th century and SO not in the digital age.
My whole impression was the course was outdated.
I have never heard of anyone else doing that course.
There is of course the Photography Institute. Download their prospectus and they will send you emails and soon enough offer you a discount or 3 :)
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"I drifted into photography like one drifts into prostitution. First I did it to please myself, then I did it to please my friends, and eventually I did it for the money." Philippe Halsman

#7 yunfat

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 15:34

Take the $1000 and visit New York. With that kind of money you should be able to spend about 90 minutes in Manhattan. :) Head over to the Highline park, take some pictures, and then browse the galleries in that neighborhood.

You will learn more about photography with such an excercise, than taking the course you mentioned.


#8 Longhiker

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 15:39

Any organized approach that emphasizes learning, practice, and critical analysis will help you grow. While most workshops cost $150 and up for a mass grouping for one afternoon, you might also want to look at local community colleges. I once took a portraiture and lighting class from a community college that cost $130 and a small group met for five hours each Saturday for 12 weeks with instruction, practice, and criticism. That's the best money I've ever spent and learned more in that three month period than I had in years on my own. Sure I had to drive 100 miles each way, but it was well worth it.
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#9 Alf Iversen

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 15:41

My God, are they still around?
I have all their materiell here somewhere, I did their course at the age of 14, mid-80's.
Coming from no-where I learned a lot.
I have no sense of humor, but I can be unintentionally funny.

#10 Bart Willems

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 16:09

Take the $1000 and visit New York. With that kind of money you should be able to spend about 90 minutes in Manhattan. :) Head over to the Highline park, take some pictures, and then browse the galleries in that neighborhood.


Don't forget to visit the MoMA, and check out the Gurski photos, so you'll learn what kind of photos you can ask millions of dollars (either Canadian or Mickey Mouse ones) for. :)

On a more serious note -- if you're not attending classes in person, why limit yourself to the NY Institute? There are many other options that are a lot more economical that seem to give you just what you're looking for—assignments with deadlines.
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#11 Nicolas

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Posted 23 January 2013 - 23:35

Take the $1000 and visit New York. With that kind of money you should be able to spend about 90 minutes in Manhattan. :) Head over to the Highline park, take some pictures, and then browse the galleries in that neighborhood.

You will learn more about photography with such an excercise, than taking the course you mentioned.


Going back to New York is definitely on my wish list. I wish it would be that easy! ;)

Any organized approach that emphasizes learning, practice, and critical analysis will help you grow. While most workshops cost $150 and up for a mass grouping for one afternoon, you might also want to look at local community colleges. I once took a portraiture and lighting class from a community college that cost $130 and a small group met for five hours each Saturday for 12 weeks with instruction, practice, and criticism. That's the best money I've ever spent and learned more in that three month period than I had in years on my own. Sure I had to drive 100 miles each way, but it was well worth it.


As I mentioned in my last post, I found some groups that get together to do some shooting (either with model with studio light and all that stuff, or do some landscape). I still keep my eyes open for any night course that could interest me.

On a more serious note -- if you're not attending classes in person, why limit yourself to the NY Institute? There are many other options that are a lot more economical that seem to give you just what you're looking for—assignments with deadlines.


In fact, I found a link to one other of these course and the content was less interesting than the NYIP; and I recalled having seen the NYIP ads few years ago. I haven't look at other options, I would have looked more at those options if I decided to continue with this idea.. but as I stated, I will continue by myself. Fix myself some challenge and after some discussion at work, I might have a buddy onboard with me for those challenges. It will definitely be much more interesting being two with the challenges than alone.

Elsa, about their prospectus... I filled their form , and even gave my home address, I knew they would send some documentation by mail. Few minutes ago (while writing this post in fact!), I got a called from an automated machine from them. The 19th century are gone for them.. at least for the phone communication of the company ;) So you might be right about getting a discount some day :)

Again, thanks all for your answer!




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