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Time Travel - Back to the '70s


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#61 nfoto

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 00:37

She would have to be seriously cute to survive the treatment of a lens with 110 degree FOV.
Bjørn

#62 James Fitzgerald

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Posted 08 February 2013 - 00:50

Maybe... Depends on which features might be the focus of our attention.
Have yet to meet an unattractive Norwegian person. :rolleyes:

#63 nfoto

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 22:57

Been quiet on this project of late, mainly due to my being troubled with asthma (and really cold weather). But the project as such is continuing and I'll write up a summary for each period. The first, looking back to '73, is soon completed.

I have now shot with all items of my old lens kit. Away from home so there are a few examples from the 105 Bellows which have to wait, but they'll come in due time.

Meanwhile, a few other examples by the 105/2.5 Nikkor that probably is the one all-time winner amongst the oldtimers.

Two schoolgirls decorating frosty car windows (D200 IR, 105/2.5 pre-AI)
J1301256738.jpg

Cranes (D800, 105/2.5 pre-AI)
J1301264507.jpg

Winter forest (D200 IR, 105/2.5 pre-AI)
Z1303036828.jpg

I had every intention of putting the 35/2.8 pre-AI to good use, but I'm not that satisfied with my achievements with it. Suffice it to say this is not to be blamed on the lens. It also handled false-colour shooting pretty well on the Fuji S3.

The 24/2.8 was used on a more regular basis and I have showed a few samples. The lens is sharp enough and still is a good performer, however, probably eclipsed these days by the modern f/1.4 sibling. Yet the old 24/2.8 is a small and neat lens when one doesn't want to stand out in the crowd with the 24/1.4.No problem using it for false-colour emulated IR either.

The 55/3.5 Micro-Nikkor was probably the sharpest Nikkor of its time and still measure up to many modern designs. It does all kinds of IR well.

The 15/5.6 is an impressive optic and delivers sharp and contrast images with the D800. Lines are presented nice and straight for medium to remotely located subjects, only up close is there some barrel distortion (probably caused by its CRC feature). There is a tendency for uneven colour rendition across the frame that can be annoying at times, though, so it will mainly be put to use for IR in the future. False-colour captures are a bit tricky due to significant focus offsets for various colour bands so using the lens this way is not recommended.

The 200/4 Nikkor Q actually is a decently sharp lens, but for landscapes it needs some filtration, such as a polariser, to render good detail because of its inherently lower contrast compared to modern optics. It performs well for IR, no hot spots, but a significant focus shift means it is best suited for cameras with LiveView in IR. It didn't do too well for false-colour Ir, though.

The 105/4 Bellows is very sharp, also when applied to distant subjects, so can be used for landscapes (maybe best used for stitching). Again, contrast is reduced so pay attention to shade the lens front in an efficient manner. People may be tempted to put this lens on a PB-4 bellows for which it was intended in its time, but most modern cameras would need a small space in order to cobble the bits and pieces together and this in turn results in infinity focus being lost. I modified a small Novoflex bellows that fits all my cameras without any spacer and allows infinity focus. Add a CPU to the bellows itself and the 105/4 Bellows can spring into action. It keeps its sharpness and excellent flatness of field all the way from visible to IR.

The 80-200/4.5 zoom lens, beautifully made, can deliver very good performance for IR. In visible light, one should stop it down preferably to f/8 or more to get optimal performance on the D800. By the way, the recommendation of restricting it to the f/8-f/16 range was written on my lens (test resuts from the film era) and apparently is valid today as well on the digital cameras. The vestiges of CA are easily removed by modern software so I don't hold their occurrence against the zoom. It does not cope well with the requirements for false-colour IR, though.

The "dog" zoom 43-86/3.5 actually is a very nice, good--performing IR lens. For visible light the performance goes down, so using it for all sorts of IR is the wiser option. It copes well with some extension to give clean and impressive close-up captures (in IR). I typically use it with an E2 or similar.
Bjørn

#64 nfoto

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Posted 17 March 2013 - 23:32

Oops, found another 15/5.6 shot. This with the Fuji S3, and the motif is the early mediaeval church ruin near by my home. (thus something I shoot frequently).

The false-colour IR did convey the gritty appearance of crusted snow in an exemplary manner. Depth of the snow pack was too much for my boots at the time, so I had to be content with the existing foot prints.

Mediaeval (11th Century) church. Fuji S3Pro, 15/5.6 Nikkor QDC

J1301312840.jpg
Bjørn

#65 Erik Lund

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Posted 18 March 2013 - 07:39

Very valuable and informative lens informations coupled with great samples An encyclopedic journey :) Thanks Bjørn.




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